Tag Archive for landscapes

The Right and Wrong Kinds of Hill

There are two ways I can close out my loops on my long morning rides out to Pevensey and points west, and both of them involve my climbing a fairly steep hill towards the end of the ride. Given that I am presented with a choice it might seem a little odd that virtually every…

A Bather’s Hut Reprise

What a difference a shift in light and mood can make to a scene. If you’ve been following this blog you might recall that a couple of weeks ago I shot a photograph of an old bathers-hut/ice cream stand on the Bexhill seafront, which I pedalled past early on a Sunday morning just as the…

The Tirah Campaign

The Tirah Campaign of 1897-98 was another of those endless frontier wars the British always seemed to be fighting on India’s northwest borders back in the glory days of Kipling and the Raj. In this case it was a group of renegade Afridi tribesmen who rose up when nobody was expecting them to and seized…

Seeing with new eyes

What a difference a week makes. Although all seemed dark and gloomy to me only last Sunday with the unwanted and much-grumbled-about (by me) shift to Daylight Savings Time, already the sun has clawed back a full fifteen minutes of that hour, and its rays could be seen bursting above the horizon at 6:33 this…

Pillars of the Community

One of the many things I love about cycling through the English countryside is the breezy familiarity you acquire here with antiquity and tradition. By that I don’t mean just the big-ticket items, the ruined castles, Norman churches and picturesque 15th century pubs, all of which by the way I see all the time on my daily jaunts, but all the little, common everyday things. Take for example those classic old Royal Mail pillar boxes.

They are so ubiquitous, so much a part of the accepted scenery, that you hardly notice them, a dash of scarlet on a curbside or at a rural crossroads, hidden in plain view. But when you look more closely you discover that some of these post boxes are old enough, antique enough if you will, to be museum pieces – or at least they would be anywhere else.